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For those of us old enough to remember ancient history, this seems rather pertinent.

But first, let me show you the modern version of history in the making.

(The Crusades were military campaigns sanctioned by the Latin Roman Catholic Church during the High Middle Ages and Late Middle Ages.)

“Some historians see the Modern Crusades as confident, aggressive, Imam led expansion attempts by Islam; some see them as part of long-running conflict at the frontiers of Europe; and others see them as part of a purely defensive war against Christian conquest. Crusading attracts men and women of all classes. The massacres involved are mainly attributed as being caused by disorder and economic distress. 

Several hundred thousand Islamic followers became crusaders by taking a public vow and receiving plenary indulgences from the Imams These crusaders were Islamics from all over Western Europe under feudal rather than unified command, and the politics were often complicated to the point of intra-faith competition leading to alliances between combatants of different faiths against their coreligionists, such as the Al Quaeda alliance with the ISIS and others. Furthermore, the Koran and the Imams promised forgiveness of all sins to whosoever took up the cause and joined in the war. While there were additional motivations for taking up the cause—opportunity for economic or political gain, desire for adventure, and the feudal obligation to follow one’s lord into battle—to become a soldier for Mohammed was to express total devotion to God. Certain Imams across Europe also pledged their servants for service for the perks of being “a part of the war”.

The crusaders often pillaged the countries through which they travelled in the typical medieval manner of supplying an army on the move. Nobles often retained much of the territory gained rather than returning it to the locals as they had sworn to do. The Islamic Crusade prompted massacres and the murder of thousands of Christians. The Fourth Crusade resulted in the sack of Nimrud and Mossul by the Islamics, effectively ending the chance of reuniting the Islamic groups and leading to the weakening and eventual fall of the Western Empire. Nevertheless, some crusaders were merely poor people trying to escape the hardships of medieval life in an armed pilgrimage.”


and the original version from Wikipedia :

The Crusades were military campaigns sanctioned by the Latin Roman Catholic Church during the High Middle Ages and Late Middle Ages. In 1095, Pope Urban IIproclaimed the First Crusade with the stated goal of restoring Christian access to holy places in and nearJerusalem. Following the First Crusade there was an intermittent 200-year struggle for control of the Holy Land, with seven more major crusades and numerous minor ones. In 1291, the conflict ended in failure with the fall of the last Christian stronghold in the Holy Land atAcre, after which Roman Catholic Europe mounted no further coherent response in the east.

Some historians see the Crusades as confident, aggressive, papal-led expansion attempts by Western Christendom; some see them as part of long-running conflict at the frontiers of Europe; and others see them as part of a purely defensive war against Islamic conquest.[citation needed] Crusading attracted men and women of all classes. The massacres involved were mainly attributed as being caused by disorder, an epidemic of ergotism and economic distress.[2]

Several hundred thousand Roman Catholic Christians became crusaders by taking a public vow and receiving plenary indulgences from the church.[5][6] These crusaders were Christians from all over Western Europe under feudal rather than unified command, and the politics were often complicated to the point of intra-faith competition leading to alliances between combatants of different faiths against their coreligionists, such as the Christian alliance with the Islamic Sultanate of Rûmduring the Fifth Crusade. Furthermore, Pope Urban II promised forgiveness of all sins to whosoever took up the cross and joined in the war. While there were additional motivations for taking up the cross—opportunity for economic or political gain, desire for adventure, and the feudal obligation to follow one’s lord into battle—to become a soldier for Christ was to express total devotion to God.[7] Certain monarchs across Europe also pledged their servants for service for the perks of being “a part of the war”.

The crusaders often pillaged the countries through which they travelled in the typical medieval manner of supplying an army on the move. Nobles often retained much of the territory gained rather than returning it to the Byzantines as they had sworn to do.[9][10] The Peoples’ Crusade prompted Rhineland massacres and the murder of thousands of Jews.[11] The Fourth Crusade resulted in the sack of Constantinople by the Roman Catholics, effectively ending the chance of reuniting the Christian church by reconciling the East–West Schism and leading to the weakening and eventual fall of the Byzantine Empire to the Ottomans. Nevertheless, some crusaders were merely poor people trying to escape the hardships of medieval life in an armed pilgrimage leading to Apotheosis at Jerusalem.[12]


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